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How Can You Tackle Air Pollution with Glass?

You would believe that winters in India are welcomed with much celebration as they bring respite from the harsh summer heat. Yet, come November, and suddenly the picture doesn’t look so rosy anymore. Cue the menace of air pollution.
Over the last few years, air pollution levels in urban centres of the country have risen steadily and have now reached alarming levels. This issue is made all the more prominent in the cold weather as fog mixes with the pollutants to give rise to smog – an extremely unhealthy air that we have now become accustomed to breathing.

So, amidst it all, how can glass technology help?
Since one spends the maximum amount of time in a day indoors, either at home or an office, the solution to air pollution lies in staying as far away from it as possible. Such a solution is possible in the realm of architecture wherein our windows and other outlets in the building a sealed and secure enough to prevent any leakage of the polluted air inside. Therefore, all you need is a sophisticated glass window system that will keep you and your loved ones safe from the smog.
Stay safe indoors with Anti-Pollution Windows
Yes, you heard that right. As a leading glass company in India, AIS has always believed in the power of innovation to solve some of the most concerning architectural issues for customers and businesses, be it at homes or offices. With the same spirit of innovation in mind, our experts have created special Anti-Pollution and Anti-Smog Windows retailed by Glasxperts that promise to save you and your loved ones from the damaging effects of air pollution.
The idea, as you might have guessed, revolves around completely sealing air leakages and spaces inside so as to prevent the external environment from leaking inside homes and offices. How is this done? Let’s have a look:

  • Fusion-welded windows with a multi-lock system

High-quality gaskets and joints strongly seal the windows along with exceptional fusion welded joints. Such physical constructs in the specialized window system make it almost impossible for pollutants to enter inside and wreak havoc. Moreover, you can make sure that these windows close extremely tightly with the help of the advanced multipoint locking system in place.

  • Silicon to shut off gaps

A popular material used in various industries, silicon proves its merit in the anti-pollution window in the form of a special sealant that shits down any gaps – both in the window and the adjacent wall.

  • Double glazing in unit glasses

Moving on to the glass, you can rest assured of multi-chambered profiles and multiple layers that make it incredibly difficult for any minute percentage of outside air that has leaked inside to reach beyond the glazing. This advanced technique of providing completely sealed Double Glazing Units also enables the windows to prevent heat and sound to leak inside.

  • The ease of retrofitting

Finally, you might be thinking what a cumbersome and expensive task it would be to remove your existing windows and replace them with special anti-pollution ones. Well, these windows by AIS can be easily retrofitted on any window surface, thus freeing you of all the hassle. Retrofitting essentially means fitting a new window surface on top of the existing one, thus improving the efficiency of the entire system!

Categories

Daylight Analysis & Glazing Selection: A Case Study

Natural lighting is an extremely important part of any building – simply because it is beneficial to both comfort and energy efficiency of an interior space. Having ideal natural lighting inside a building can reduce the dependency on artificial lighting and create a much more holistic environment for rest, relaxation and work.

Yet, enabling the perfect balance of natural light within a building is not merely a function of using a glazing which will reflect heat and filter light. It depends on quite many factors, including the building orientation, the appropriateness of light diffusers installed, and also the kind of façades and windows in place. Thus, architect and building owners must conduct a thorough daylight analysis of any building in order to suggest glass that minimises discomfort and maximises visibility. Only after analysing the results of such a study can one opt for retrofitting buildings with low-E glass or going for a new glazing with the ideal U-value and SHGC.

This is what we performed for a corporate building in Mumbai.

CHALLENGE

A corporate building in Mumbai required an optimum glazing solution to maximize its VLT (visible light transmission) requirement without overdesigning the building.

SOLUTION

Going by the specifications of glass, one with the lowest U-value and SHGC would have been the right solution for the corporate building. Yet the solution was not so easy.

In order to determine the effect of various glazing variants on the building, a daylight analysis was performed. The two glazing variants simulated for the building were Clear Glass (VLT 78%) and high performance glass (VLT 21%). Both the glasses performed identically in terms of achieving the optimal lux levels. Clear Glass, in fact, caused glare in certain portions of the building.

As can be seen in Fig. 2, the first case is Clear Glass (VLT = 78%). The pink region shows the area which will have glare, and the grey region indicates sub-optimal lighting. The second case is high-performance glass (VLT = 21%). Here, we can see the reduction in glare area without reducing optimum lux level.

Thus, AIS recommended using high-performance glass in order to reduce cooling load without compromising on the lighting load.

RESULTS

From the study conducted, the following results were deduced:

  • The same fenestration behaves differently depending on the specific design.
  • It should not be assumed that products with low U-Value and SHGC are the best and universal solution.
  • For windows receiving a high amount of solar radiation, products with low SHGC would perform better. Hence, a glazing solution should be selected only after thoroughly analysing the building design.

As mentioned earlier, architects and glass manufacturers have to study various factors in building design before selecting the ideal glazing. An important factor is window orientation and area which allows ideal dispersion of daylight without causing glare or excess heat gain. It has been observed that south-facing windows let in the highest amount of daylight while north-facing windows let in diffused and reflected glare-free light. On the other hand, east- and west-facing windows let in direct sunlight, glare, and heat gain, which are difficult to manage. Thus, different glazing solutions are required for different orientations, especially in the kind of building mentioned in the case study.

Categories

Daylight Analysis & Glazing Selection: A Case Study


Natural lighting is an extremely important part of any building – simply because it is beneficial to both comfort and energy efficiency of an interior space. Having ideal natural lighting inside a building can reduce the dependency on artificial lighting and create a much more holistic environment for rest, relaxation and work.
Yet, enabling the perfect balance of natural light within a building is not merely a function of using a glazing which will reflect heat and filter light. It depends on quite many factors, including the building orientation, the appropriateness of light diffusers installed, and also the kind of façades and windows in place. Thus, architect and building owners must conduct a thorough daylight analysis of any building in order to suggest glass that minimises discomfort and maximises visibility. Only after analysing the results of such a study can one opt for retrofitting buildings with low-E glass or going for a new glazing with the ideal U-value and SHGC.
This is what we performed for a corporate building in Mumbai.
CHALLENGE
A corporate building in Mumbai required an optimum glazing solution to maximize its VLT (visible light transmission) requirement without overdesigning the building.
SOLUTION
Going by the specifications of glass, one with the lowest U-value and SHGC would have been the right solution for the corporate building. Yet the solution was not so easy.
In order to determine the effect of various glazing variants on the building, a daylight analysis was performed. The two glazing variants simulated for the building were Clear Glass (VLT 78%) and high performance glass (VLT 21%). Both the glasses performed identically in terms of achieving the optimal lux levels. Clear Glass, in fact, caused glare in certain portions of the building.

As can be seen in Fig. 2, the first case is Clear Glass (VLT = 78%). The pink region shows the area which will have glare, and the grey region indicates sub-optimal lighting. The second case is high-performance glass (VLT = 21%). Here, we can see the reduction in glare area without reducing optimum lux level.
Thus, AIS recommended using high-performance glass in order to reduce cooling load without compromising on the lighting load.
RESULTS
From the study conducted, the following results were deduced:

  • The same fenestration behaves differently depending on the specific design.
  • It should not be assumed that products with low U-Value and SHGC are the best and universal solution.
  • For windows receiving a high amount of solar radiation, products with low SHGC would perform better. Hence, a glazing solution should be selected only after thoroughly analysing the building design.

As mentioned earlier, architects and glass manufacturers have to study various factors in building design before selecting the ideal glazing. An important factor is window orientation and area which allows ideal dispersion of daylight without causing glare or excess heat gain. It has been observed that south-facing windows let in the highest amount of daylight while north-facing windows let in diffused and reflected glare-free light. On the other hand, east- and west-facing windows let in direct sunlight, glare, and heat gain, which are difficult to manage. Thus, different glazing solutions are required for different orientations, especially in the kind of building mentioned in the case study.

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